Alabama Code Camp – Jan 23

13. January 2010 14:04

I wanted to post a reminder that the next Alabama Code Camp will be held next Saturday (Jan 23) in Mobile, AL at the University of South Alabama.  This will be a great opportunity to network with other developers around the region, learn about aspects of .NET and peripheral technologies with which you are not familiar, and have an opportunity to pick the brains of other developers related to issues you have been facing.

You can get additional information at http://www.alabamacodecamp.com.  And…don’t forget to register.  I hope to see you there.  Feel free to look me up.  I’m always happy to sit around and talk about software development.

As of right now, I will be presenting two sessions (with additional sessions on stand-by in the event of a cancellation).  Here are the abstracts:


Writing SOLID Code: An Overview of the SOLID Principles

SOLID is an acronym that represents five crucial principles of class design in object oriented development.  The terms were originally coined by Robert Martin (aka Uncle Bob) in the 1990s.  Although these concepts are certainly now new, many developers in the mainstream .NET community are unaware they exist.  In this session, we will examine the significance of these principles as well as some practical examples of how to apply them in your applications.  Come and learn how pragmatically embracing these concepts can make a significant difference in the quality and flexibility of your code.


Why You Should Care About Dependency Injection

Over the last year or two, .NET developers have begun to hear more about terms such as Inversion of Control, Dependency Injection, and IoC Containers.  However, there are still many developers that don’t have any exposure to the concepts or possess a practical understanding of how/when to apply them.  Are you curious what these terms mean, why they are important, and how to apply them?  Please join me for a practical and interactive discussion about how you can greatly reduce the coupling of your code and increase the flexibility of your application by leveraging these concepts.  The Unity IoC Container will be used as a reference for this presentation, but the concepts are applicable to your container of choice.


Write Code Like a Ninja: An Introduction to Resharper

Have you ever been frustrated with Visual Studio?  Do you ever find yourself thinking there must be a faster way to perform a given task, especially those that you do over and over again?  Wouldn't it be nice if there was some shortcut to automate these repetitive tasks such as refactoring?  Fortunately, there is an answer to a lot of these questions.  Resharper is a commercial add-in for Visual Studio that is developed by JetBrains.  Come and see how this inexpensive product can dramatically increase your productivity to help you write code like .NET ninja.  We will go through a comprehensive overview of the major functionality that Resharper 5.0 has to offer as well as a few tidbits of hidden features within Visual Studio.

Comments

1/23/2010 9:46:36 PM #

Matthew J. Hughes

Jeff rocked the talk - how in the world you can cover SOLID with code examples in <1 hour, I have no idea - but he did it!  Great coverage, great examples. Thanks Jeff.

Matthew J. Hughes United States |

1/24/2010 3:57:39 PM #

jeff

Thanks Matt.  I appreciate the positive feedback.

jeff United States |

Comments are closed

About Me

I'm a passionate software developer and advocate of the Microsoft .NET platform.  In my opinion, software development is a craft that necessitates a conscious effort to continually improve your skills rather than falling into the trap of complacency.  I was also awarded as a Microsoft MVP in Connected Systems in 2008, 2009, and 2010.


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